Graduate Courses

Undergraduate Minor Courses: Please see STS Minor section.

In addition to the coursework required by their home departments, all Science Studies graduate students are required to take the Introduction to Science Studies (Part I & II), Colloquium in Science Studies, and the Science Studies Core seminars.

Following is the list of Science Studies courses offered this year as well as a list of Science Studies courses from the UC San Diego General Catalog. Students should review the UC San Diego Quarterly Schedule of Classes to find out which courses will be offered during a particular quarter

Science Studies Core Courses

COGR 225A, HIGR 238, PHIL 209A, SOCG 255A. Introduction to Science Studies, Part I

Study and discussion of classic themes and texts in history of science, sociology of science, and philosophy of science, and of work that attempts to develop an interdisciplinary science studies approach. Required for all students in the Science Studies Program. Prerequisite: enrollment in Science Studies Program.

COGR 225B, HIGR 239, PHIL 209B, SOCG 255B. Seminar in Science Studies

Study and discussion of a selected topic in the science studies field, with an emphasis on the development of research and writing skills. Required for all students in the Science Studies Program. The topic varies from year to year, and students may, therefore, repeat the course for credit. Prerequisite: enrollment in Science Studies Program.

COGR 225C, HIGR 240, PHIL 209C, SOCG 255C. Colloquium in Science Studies

A forum for the presentation and discussion of research in progress in science studies, by graduate students, faculty, and visitors. Students must attend the colloquium series for their entire first and second years. They receive course credit in one quarter each year. Required for all students in the Science Studies Program. Prerequisite: enrollment in the Science Studies Program.

COGR 225D, HIGR 241, PHIL 209D, SOCG 255D. Introduction to Science Studies, Part II

(formerly Advanced Approaches to Science Studies)Continuing the introduction developed in Part I, this course examines recent key topics and problem situations in Science Studies. Emphasis is on recent theoretical perspectives and empirical studies in Communication, History, Philosophy, and Sociology of science and technology, and the interplay between them.Required of all students in the Science Studies Program. Prerequisites: completion of COGR 225A, HIGR 238, PHIL 209A, or SOCG 255A; enrollment in Science Studies Program or instructor’s permission.

Communication

COGR 201I. Ethnography of Information Systems

This course will survey the rapidly growing body of ethnographic analyses of information systems, to extend the basic principles of ethnographic research and to lead students in the development of projects modifying these principles for the emerging electronic environment. Students may approach the course in one (or both) of two ways—either preparing for and carrying out a pilot ethnographic study or studying the theoretical literature in depth.

History

HIGR 235. Science, Empire and Exploration

Examines links between scientific work, particularly expeditions and exploration, and political programs of empire in the 17-20th centuries. Topics: collecting expeditions as expressions of empire; role of colonial administrative networks in facilitating field-based investigations; relation between European and non-European knowledge systems

HIGR 236A-B. Seminar in History of Science

A two-quarter research seminar, comprising intensive study of a specific topic in the history of science. The first quarter will be devoted to readings and discussions; the second chiefly to the writing of individual research papers. The topic varies from year to year, and students may repeat the course for credit. (IP grade to be awarded the first quarter; final grade will be given at the end of the second quarter.)

HIGR 242. Topics in the History of Earth and Life Sciences

Intensive study of specific problems in the history of the life sciences and earth sciences, ranging in period from the Renaissance to the 21st century. May be repeated for credit as topics will vary annually.

HIGR 243. Historical Scholarship in Technology

An introduction to the historiography of technology. This reading seminar provides an overview of scholarly approaches to the history of technology by critically examining classic and contemporary works in the field.

HISC 260. Historical Approaches to the Study of Science

This colloquium course will introduce students to the rich variety of ways in which the scientific enterprise is currently being studied historically. Major recent publications on specific topics in the history of science selected to illustrate this diversity will be discussed and analyzed; the topics will range in period from the seventeenth century to the late twentieth, and will deal with all major branches of natural science.

HISC 262. Problems in the History of Science and Religion

Intensive study of specific problems in the relation between science and religion. The problems may range in period from the Renaissance to the twentieth century. Topics vary from year to year.

HISC 263. History, Science, and Politics of Climate Change

The complex historical development of human understanding of global climate change, including key scientific work, and the cultural dimensions of proof and persuasion.  Special emphasis on the differential political acceptance of the scientific evidence in the U.S. and the world.

HISC 264. Topics in the History of the Physical Sciences

Intensive study of specific problems in the physical (including chemical and mathematical) sciences, ranging in period from the Renaissance to the twentieth century. Topics vary from year to year.

HISC 265. Topics in Twentieth-Century Science and Culture

This is a seminar open to advanced undergraduates and graduate students that explores topics at the interface of science, technology and culture, from the late nineteenth century to the present. Topics change yearly; may be repeated for credit with instructor’s consent.

HISC 266. The Galileo Affair

Galileo’s condemnation by the Catholic Church in 1633 is a well-known but misunderstood episode. Was Galileo punished for holding dangerous scientific views? Personal arrogance? Disobedience? Religious transgressions? Readings in original sources, recent historical interpretations.

HISC 270. Topics in the History of Science and Technology

This seminar explores topics at the interface of science, technology, and society, ranging from the seventeenth century to the twentieth.

HISC 272. Building America: Technology, Culture, and the Built Environment in the United States

The history of the built environment in the United States, from skyscrapers to suburbs, canals and railroads to factories and department stores. The technological history of structures and infrastructures, and the social and cultural values that have been “built into” our material environment.

HISC 277. Science and the Enlightenment

In 1784, Kant asked, “What is Enlightenment?” In this course we will pursue this question, which has remained hotly debated ever since.

HISC 280. Science and Public Policy

This course will explore the evolution of the institutions, ideologies, procedures, standards, and expertise that modern democratic societies have used in applying science to generate and legitimate public policy.

Philosophy

Phil. 204A. Core Course in Philosophy of Science

An introduction to one or more central problems in the philosophy of science, or in the philosophy of one of the particular sciences, such as the nature of confirmation and explanation, the nature of scientific knowledge, reductionism, the unity of science, or realism and antirealism. May be taken for credit three times with changed content.

Phil. 245. Philosophy of Science

This seminar will cover current books and theoretical issues in the philosophy of science. May be taken for credit seven times with changed content.

Phil. 246. Philosophy of Physics

Systematic problems and historical and contemporary perspectives on foundational issues in physics. May include issues in the philosophy of space and time, the interpretation of relativity theory and quantum mechanics, or the foundations of statistical mechanics and probability. May be taken for credit six times with changed content.

Phil. 247. Philosophy of Biology

Historical and contemporary perspectives on foundational issues about biology. May include questions about the nature of biological explanation, the relation of biology to chemistry and physics, the status of attributions of function, and the relation of biology to the social sciences. May be taken for credit six times with changed content.

Phil. 250A. Philosophy of the Cognitive Sciences

Contemporary debates about the study of the mind-brain as studied in one or more of the empirical cognitive sciences. May include questions about the different strategies of explanation invoked, the conceptions of representation employed, the connections between theoretical models developed. May be taken for credit six times with changed content.

Phil. 280. Philosophy of Science Topics and Methods

This course meets weekly to discuss recent books or articles in philosophy of science. The reading is designed both for students doing active research in the field and for those seeking to gain some familiarity with it. Can be taken nine times for credit with changed content.

Sociology

SOCG 234. Intellectual Foundation of the Study of Science, Technology, and Medicine

This course focuses on some classic methodological and theoretical resources upon which the sociology of science, technology, and medicine all draw. It gives special attention to relationships between knowledge and social order, and between knowledge and practice, that are common to science, technology, and medicine.

SOCG 247. Madness and Society

An examination of the historical and sociological literatures on the relationship between madness and society, focusing primarily on the United States and Great Britain but with some comparative reference to western Europe.

SOCG 249. Technology and the Human

This course explores the ethical and political implications of technological interventions into human life. Approaches from science studies, the sociology of the body, and philosophy. Topics include transformations in domains of life such as work, health, childhood, and death.

SOCG 283. The Making of Modern Medicine

An examination of the intellectual, social, cultural, and political dimensions of the Transformation of Western medicine from 1750 to 1900, with a primary focus on Anglo-American developments.

SOCG 284. Contemporary Biomedicine

Develops central themes in medical sociology in order to understand twentieth- and twenty-first-century medical practice and research. Topics include authority and expertise; health inequalities; managed care; health activism; biomedical knowledge production; and the construction of medical objects and subjects.

SOCG 288. Knowledge Capitalism

This seminar examines the place of scientific knowledge and information and communication technology in the transformation of capitalist economy and society. The class explores new interactions between science studies and the social theory of advanced capitalism.

Course Offerings PDF files

2016-17

2015-16

2014-15

2013-14

2012-13